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Expeditions and Travels

Arctic, Expeditions and Travels

Expeditions to the Arctic: 2000-2003

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2000 Introduction June 28 June 30 July 1 July 3 July 4 July 6 July 8 July 10 July 12 Conclusion 2001 June 27 June 30 July 3 July 6 July 9 July 13 July 15 2002 June 18 June 21 June 25 June 30 July 2 July 4 2003 Red Knot Field Journals June 21 June 23 June 26 June 28 July 4 July 6 July 8 Red Knot/Brant Aerial Surveys June 29 June 30 July 1 July 2 July 4

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Expeditions and Travels, Tierra Del Fuego

Expeditions to Tierra del Fuego: 2001-2004

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It was passed from one bird to another, the whole gift of the day. The day went from flute to flute, went dressed in vegetation, in flights which opened a tunnel through the wind would pass to where birds were breaking open the dense blue air – and there, night came in. -Pablo Neruda “Bird” 2001 Introduction February 3 February 4 February 5 February 6 February 7 February 8 February 9 February 10 February 12   2002 Introduction January 25-26 January 27 January 29 January 31 February 3 February 7   2003 Introduction January 29 January 30 February 3 February…

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Brazil, Expeditions and Travels, Travel

On the Birds and Boats of Brazil

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Birds and Boats I am a biologist that loves the birds and boats of northern Brazil. For good reason. In addition to the enormous bird diversity inherent in all tropical environments, the northern coast of Brazil in the states of Para and Maranhao stands out as one of the most important shorebird wintering areas in the western hemisphere.  It’s an amazingly vast area of mostly unpopulated beaches, intertidal sand and mud flats and mangrove forests. This ecological wonder also produces an abundance of fish and shellfish, on which the birds depend.  It also supports a network of traditional villages and…

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Bird Study, Brazil

Our Brazilian Expedition – Trapping Shorebirds in Panaquatira

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The capture of Arctic nesting shorebirds first brought us to Brazil in 2013.  We also brought 125 geolocators and caught both ruddy turnstones and red knots, attaching 85 on the former and 30 on the latter.  But we also came to create a new perspective on shorebirds in this place, one of the most important shorebird habitats in the world. For all intents and purposes, shorebird work in this area started In the mid-1980’s, when Canadian biologists, Guy Morrison and Ken Ross surveyed from an airplane, the entire coast of South America.  In this monumental and dangerous survey, they established…

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Brazil, rural communities

Our Brazilian Expedition – The Rights of Traditional Communities

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Over the last few days of our expedition, we left the state of Para and flew to Sao Luis in the adjacent state of Maranhao.  There we begin the next phase of our work, trapping red knots, ruddy turnstones and other species, as we have done since 2014.     Traditional Communities Have Rights But prior to leaving Para, while we stayed in the village of Apiu Salvatore, the fishermen asked to meet with Max.  He hadn’t planned it, so at first, the reason was unknown. The fishermen of the village knew Max represented ICMBio, and that Apiu Salvatore fell within…

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Bird Study, Brazil, rural communities

Our Brazilian Expedition – Going to the heart of the Mangrove and Beach Ecosystem

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It took us long into the night to reach our next port.  We went from the relatively populated area of Braganca to the dark heart of this coastal region of Viseu.   In three trucks, we caravanned through a maze of remnant tropical rainforests, cattle pasture and impenetrable second-growth woodland.  Along the rain-slicked red clay road, small and desperate looking towns popped out of nowhere always looking like the past was a better day. The road cut through countless mangrove forests that define this region.  We reached Viseu too late to do anything but find a place to stay the night….

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Bird Study, Brazil, rural communities

Our Brazilian Expedition – Conducting a Scientific Investigation in a Tropical Wilderness

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  Tough Conditions for Scientific Investigation   It’s hard to imagine the difficulties of people living at latitude 37 degrees north when coming to the equator in northern Brazil. It challenges even the best-prepared field investigations.  But after three days our team has not only acclimated but accomplished surveys in two separate estuaries.     The tide cut short our first day in the field.  High tide persisted longer than we expected and our survey must take place when birds forage.  Shorebirds typically forage until 1 to 2 after before high tide and start again 1-2 hours after, usually resting…

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Brazil, Expeditions and Travels

Our Brazilian Expedition – investigating the plight of shorebirds and rural people

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We leave a cold and dark NJ with mix feelings for our destination tropical Brazil.  It will be warm and sunnyish –  forecasts predict drenching thunderstorms threatening us every day of our trip.  We will explore a very new place, the ocean coast of Para, a largely unsurveyed coast known to be a wintering shorebird mecca.  At the same time, we will undergo trials experienced by few biologists.  Zeke is prevalent in Para, but recent cases of malaria are equally alarming.  Of course one must be ever vigilant for food and water pathogens.  Last year I developed food poisoning ending…

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conservation policy, Conserving Wildlife, Expeditions and Travels, Uncategorized

Inuit Wisdom on Conservation

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In July of last year, our trip in search of red knots from my home in Greenwich, NJ to the small Arctic town of Coral Harbor in Southampton Island took us to some of the most remote wilderness in this hemisphere. But we also leaped from a modern socially connected world to one with third world communication and economic systems. You can’t use your cell phone in Coral Harbor, in fact neither can the mostly Inuit population. They use Facebook with enthusiasm but have virtually dial-up internet speeds. The cost of a case of coke is $45. An overnight stay…

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Conserving Wildlife, Delaware Bay, Expeditions and Travels

Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate

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Two Bays Two Worlds Most see the Delaware Bay as the poor and sad relation to the more prosperous and vibrant Chesapeake Bay. There is no doubt the Chesapeake bay is far wealthier than it’s sister bay only a few miles to the east. With cities like Annapolis or towns like St Michaels, the Chesapeake attracts millions to its shores each year, and this propels a vibrant economy. The Delaware Bay remains mired in an economic funk, one could argue started over three decades ago. Wildlife conservationists would see it differently however.  The Chesapeake sports a persistent oxygen-free dead zone…

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Conserving Wildlife, Delaware Bay, Expeditions and Travels

Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate a photo journal

Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
Two Bays Two Worlds Same Fate  a photo journal
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This gallery is a photographic journal of  our sailing trip from Oxford Md, on the Choptank River that flows into middle section of the Chesapeake Bay to our home port of Greenwich, NJ on the Cohansey River which flows into the upper Delaware Bay .  Our trip started on December 28,2015 and ended 4 days later.  Our Sailboat is a Cape Dory 26, a classic full keel  Alberg design with standing headroom and room enough for two on a trip.  It’s a very sweet boat. In the following post this author describes impressions while sailing from one powerful and beautiful…

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Arctic, Bird Study, Conserving Wildlife, Delaware Bay, Expeditions and Travels, habitat management, Restoring Habitat, Science, shorebird conservation, shorebird ecology, wildlife conservation, wildlife tracking

The Red Knots “Vote with their Wings”

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Clive Minton is fond of saying, “the knots vote with their wings” as a way of saying knots concentrate in the best places for knots. Of course it’s true, animals move to the habitats they find most suitable, nature leaves little room for anything but. Sometimes however, animals use a habitat only because they have little choice — in other words, they are making the best of a bad situation. The job of a good wildlife biologist is to understand the difference. Unfortunately, it’s often not obvious. In all the places studied by this author — Tierra del Fuego, the…

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Arctic, Bird Study, conservation policy, Conserving Wildlife, Delaware Bay, Expeditions and Travels, habitat management, Restoring Habitat, Science, shorebird conservation, shorebird ecology, wildlife conservation, wildlife tracking

19,077 Red Knots Observed in New Jersey

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Despite the threatening forecast of a cold drizzle and strong winds, our team persevered to complete the first bay-wide count of this season. On the New Jersey side of Delaware Bay, we counted 19,077 red knots – the most seen in the state in a decade. With Delaware’s shorebird team recording 2,000 knots along their entire shoreline, the total knot count of 21,077 is not far from the 24,000 seasonal maximum of the last three years. This is good news in either of two completely different ways. One explanation is that perhaps most of the knots have already come to…

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Bird Study, Brazil, conservation policy, Conserving Wildlife, Delaware Bay, Expeditions and Travels, habitat management, Science, shorebird conservation, shorebird ecology, wildlife conservation, wildlife tracking

Delaware Bay Shorebird Project Continues for 2015 Season!

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The value of a shorebird stopover like Delaware Bay can be seen in the shaky cam movie by this author.  Red knots – some recently arrived after a grueling 6,000-mile flight over 6 days of continuous flying – arrive on the Bayshore desperate for food. Over the last 10,000 years, the species has evolved to fly directly to the Bay to feed on the eggs of the horseshoe crab. The 450-million year-old crab – which is actually in the spider family – crawls ashore and lays pin-sized eggs about 6 inches deep in the sand. When there are many crabs, as…

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