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Tierra Del Fuego 2003

Chile, Expeditions and Travels, Red Knot, Shorebird, Tierra Del Fuego 2003

Expedition to Tierra del Fuego – 2003: Introduction

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On our fourth trip to the southern-most tip of South America, our team will focus once again on the condition of the wintering red knots (summering knots for South Americans). These are the same birds that stopover on the Delaware Bay each May to refuel before flying to nest in the Canadian Arctic. After leaving the Arctic in late July, red knots make a journey that nearly spans the globe to the shores of Chile and Argentina where we will do our work. When they leave in late February they will slowly work their way up the South American coast…

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Chile, Expeditions and Travels, Red Knot, Shorebird, Tierra Del Fuego 2003

Expedition to Tierra del Fuego – February 3, 2003

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Previous Post On January 31, Lisa returned with good news on our efforts to promote the desigation of Bahia Lomas as RAMSAR site. She met with Marcos Cordero, Regional Director of CONAF (Corporacion Nacional Forestal) and with Maria Christina Lagos, Ingeniero Agrónomo of CONAMA, (Commision Nacional del Medio Ambiente) in Punta Arenas to discuss the government’s position. Lisa learned that Elier Tabilo, who works with the Neotropical Center for Wetlands Training in Chile, has been in touch with a number of government officials to express strong support for RAMSAR designation of Bahia Lomas. Yerko Vilino of the Universidad Santo Tomas,…

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Chile, Expeditions and Travels, Red Knot, Shorebird, texas, Tierra Del Fuego 2003

Expedition to Tierra del Fuego – February 6, 2003

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Previous Post Adding to our concern over the low numbers of red knots on the bay is the low proportion of immatures. In healthy shorebird populations one could expect 1 out of every 3-5 birds to be young of the year. For example in 2002 we found 1 out of every 3 godwits (36%) to be young of the year. For red knots the figure was much lower, 1 out of 17 (6%). This year only 5% of the knots were immatures. Why the lower rate? One possibility is juveniles don’t come to Tierra del Fuego to winter but stop…

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Chile, Expeditions and Travels, Red Knot, Shorebird, Tierra Del Fuego 2003

Expedition to Tierra del Fuego – January 29, 2003

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Previous Post Our 20-hour journey into Punta Arenas drained all of us but went without any major difficulty. Jorge Jordan, Ricardo Matus and Olivia Blank provided us with logistic support that made it much easier to prepare for our field camp along the shores of Bahia Lomas. This was so much more important than any other year because our team has grown to 22 people. The logistical needs of a group this size will strain all resources from food all the way down to latrine management. However, the benefit of a team composed of equal numbers of North and South…

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