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birds

Bird Study, Conserving Wildlife, Delaware Bay, habitat management, Science, shorebird conservation, shorebird ecology, wildlife conservation, wildlife tracking

2015 Delaware Bay Shorebird Banding Season Ends

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All our efforts to help shorebirds on Delaware Bay this year couldn’t have been better rewarded – nearly every red knot left the bay in good condition and in one of the earliest departures in the 19 years of the Project. We counted just over 24,000 knots in our aerial count of the entire Bayshore on May 26th. Just two days later, most had left and we could find only a few hundred, feeding on eggs like human shoppers feed on bargains at a half-price sale. By May 31st, virtually all were gone, along with the ruddy turnstones, sanderlings and…

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Australia, Bird Study, Expeditions and Travels, Science

Australia Road Trip Learning The Science of Feather Molt

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    Red knot flight feathers. Primary flight feathers (or “primaries”) are at the outer wing, secondary flight feathers (or “secondaries”) are at the inner wing. The 10 primaries point more toward the wing tip while the secondaries point more toward the body (you can see this difference below the bend of the wing).   If dealing with the effect of heat on bird and team is the first major lesson of trapping in northwest Australia, the complicated wing molt of tropical non-breeding waders is the second. The heat, sun and wind wear down everything. For example the engraved leg…

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Chile, Expeditions and Travels, travel and wildlife, wildlife conservation

Chile Expedition2007 A Tide to Remember

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After traveling nearly 8000 miles over two days we have established our camp at Bahia Lomas on the northern shore of the island of Tierra Del Fuego, just inside the entrance to the Strait of Magellan, close to the Atlantic coast. Over the next two weeks, our small team will determine the status of the population of red knots that spend the northern winter on the Bahia Lomas mudflats. When our studies began in 2000, we found more than 50,000 red knots and 26,000 Hudsonian godwits (both pictured at left) spread throughout the length of the Bay. The knot population…

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